Ships of Oak, Guns of Iron:

In 1814, the US already had the highest per capita income and one of the largest territories of any country, a mid-sized population of eight million – significant for countries of the time; and it had taken on Great Britain, the military and economic superpower of the day, and fought it to a stalemate on the land and sea. 

 

Treasury’s War:

Have you ever wondered how the United States and other countries actually conduct “financial warfare”?   

 

From Georgetown to George Town – by Bill Walker

William Stuart Walker was one of the pivotal figures in the creation of Cayman as an offshore financial center and its subsequent development. Among...

“When Money Dies: The Nightmare of Deficit Spending, Devaluation and

“The Treaty includes no provisions for the economic rehabilitation of Europe, – nothing to make the defeated Central Empire into good neighbours, nothing to stabilise the new States of Europe …  

 

Inside the Nixon Administration:

 

 On 15 August, 1971, President Richard Nixon unilaterally ended the international system of rules that had governed the financing of international trade and investment since the end of World War II.

Adam Lebor’s “Tower of Basel”

When the Bank for International Settlements was established almost 80 years ago to administer Germany’s World War I reparation payments, making payments from one country to another was more difficult than now.  

 

‘Fault Lines’ by Raghuram G. Rajan

Read our article in the Cayman Financial Review Magazine, eversion Much has already been written about the causes and cures of the financial crisis of...

Reading Privacy

The top two authors on privacy issues, one focused on financial issues and one not, are Prof Rose-Marie Antoine of the University of the West Indies and Prof Daniel Solove of George Washington University.

 

Good fences? Cross-border bankruptcy law

“Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds, nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds, nought and six, result misery.”

 

David Stockman’s The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America

For six years I’ve told audiences (and even more than a few social acquaintances who would listen) that the 2008-09 Global Financial Crisis was not “The Big One.” In time, people will look back on that episode as relatively minor and fairly short-lived compared to the one we are building toward. Don’t believe me? 

 

Dollars, Euros, and Debt:

Vito Tanzi has again given us a solid economic explanation of what went wrong and why, and what can be done about it. Governments have grown too large, have spent way too much money, and have tried to get out of the mess through the inappropriate use of monetary policy rather than by drastically cutting spending. 

 

How the government monopoly on money imperils the global economy

Detlev Schlichter says that “Today’s mainstream view on money is logically incoherent because it is in fundamental conflict with essential aspects of money and money’s role in a market economy.” 

 

Trade Policy Disaster: Lessons from

At the beginning of the Great Depression, world trade dropped by an “astounding 65 per cent in gold-dollar terms”.  

 

“Hedge Fund Governance – Evaluating oversight,

At the end of the first chapter I was frustrated, as I was looking for a theoretical analysis and conclusion regarding corporate governance in hedge funds.
 

 

The Monetary Conservative:

Inflation is the work of the devil, because it respects appearances without destroying anything but the realities.  Jacques Rueff

 

The Ascent of Money: A financial history of the world

Reviewed by Richard W. RahnHow much money do you have? It is most often considered an impolite question and therefore seldom asked, but nevertheless...

This Time is Different:

Have you ever encountered a book in your field of inquiry that upon reading, you knew the book should be put on that special shelf reserved for favourites? That the book was so fundamentally good and strong that you would be reading it again and again and referring others to do the same? 

Reading Ireland

The Irish boom was real, up to a point, but the Irish crash is real too. Like her boom, Ireland’s subsequent problems have spawned a substantial literature – here we provide a guide to some of the more interesting.

The Money Trap:

Robert Pringle’s The Money Trap should be very high on the list of books for anyone wanting to understand the weaknesses and flaws in the existing approaches to national monetary and banking policies and the international arrangements that link them.   

 

Regulating Criminal Finance in the Global Economy

Sharman’s book is a most interesting contribution to the discourse on the current measures to control money laundering and, to a lesser extent, terrorist financing.